2 replaced http://ui.stackexchange.com/ with https://ux.stackexchange.com/
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I don't know what the test for "acceptable" list questions is, but here are some thoughts:

It might be that for some questions, the single "right" answer is an aggregate of many items; no individual is likely to have all of the items; and those items must be collected and sorted by several members of the community. (Hence the unwritten laws that list questions should CW, there should be one item per answer, and it's okay to post multiple answers.)

Another theory is that a question may have several answers that are not mutually exclusive. While you may have to choose between jQuery, Dojo, and Ext JS, you'll never be forced to select just one of several Hidden Secrets of JavaScript.

Also I think the answers should be useful to others. Entertaining answers are good as long as they clearly have practical applications. But that one applies to normal (non-list) questions too.

The book questionbook question passes all of these tests.

I don't know what the test for "acceptable" list questions is, but here are some thoughts:

It might be that for some questions, the single "right" answer is an aggregate of many items; no individual is likely to have all of the items; and those items must be collected and sorted by several members of the community. (Hence the unwritten laws that list questions should CW, there should be one item per answer, and it's okay to post multiple answers.)

Another theory is that a question may have several answers that are not mutually exclusive. While you may have to choose between jQuery, Dojo, and Ext JS, you'll never be forced to select just one of several Hidden Secrets of JavaScript.

Also I think the answers should be useful to others. Entertaining answers are good as long as they clearly have practical applications. But that one applies to normal (non-list) questions too.

The book question passes all of these tests.

I don't know what the test for "acceptable" list questions is, but here are some thoughts:

It might be that for some questions, the single "right" answer is an aggregate of many items; no individual is likely to have all of the items; and those items must be collected and sorted by several members of the community. (Hence the unwritten laws that list questions should CW, there should be one item per answer, and it's okay to post multiple answers.)

Another theory is that a question may have several answers that are not mutually exclusive. While you may have to choose between jQuery, Dojo, and Ext JS, you'll never be forced to select just one of several Hidden Secrets of JavaScript.

Also I think the answers should be useful to others. Entertaining answers are good as long as they clearly have practical applications. But that one applies to normal (non-list) questions too.

The book question passes all of these tests.

1
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I don't know what the test for "acceptable" list questions is, but here are some thoughts:

It might be that for some questions, the single "right" answer is an aggregate of many items; no individual is likely to have all of the items; and those items must be collected and sorted by several members of the community. (Hence the unwritten laws that list questions should CW, there should be one item per answer, and it's okay to post multiple answers.)

Another theory is that a question may have several answers that are not mutually exclusive. While you may have to choose between jQuery, Dojo, and Ext JS, you'll never be forced to select just one of several Hidden Secrets of JavaScript.

Also I think the answers should be useful to others. Entertaining answers are good as long as they clearly have practical applications. But that one applies to normal (non-list) questions too.

The book question passes all of these tests.