3 Removed link to the specific thread to keep the focus on improving practices. The actual users and question involved are unimportant.
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Context

For reference, check out this question.

  1. I wrote a question
  2. Received a downvote and wasuser #1 told to read the faqs for better questions
  3. AskedI asked for more specific feedback on the question, so I could learn how to improve it
  4. At the same time, another user #2 edited the question to be something very different
  5. AnotherThen user #3 submitted an answer
  6. I proposed a revision to the question
  7. I received no feedback, so I posted a separate question
  8. The question was edited again by another user
  9. I now have an answer for that question #4
  10. I never learned how to improve my original question, or what made it a bad question, and I've spent two hours between writing responses on it, writing a separate question, and writing this meta post.

Problem

It's convenient for those with privs to go in and edit. When that happens, however:

  • The original question gets deleted
  • The question's original asker can't compare the original and revised versions
  • The question asker may not remember the original version
  • The new question's writer now has some ownership in the question
  • The question's meaning may get changed
  • Other users may spend time answering questions that nobody individually "owns" anymore
  • It wastes the user's time, which makes it more likely new users will leave
  • New users (like myself), can feel frustrated by wanting to improve their questions and instead having the question edited without constructive feedback

Suggestions

So a few suggestions on helping new users learn from editing:

  • If a user takes the time to write a question, it's considerate and respectful to ask before changing it
  • Explain why the question doesn't meet guidelines and suggest a different version
  • Provide constructive and specific feedback
  • If you must edit without asking (though I see no good reason for doing so), post the pre-edited version so users can compare (Feature request: SE should really build versioning in, if they're going to have the editing without asking ability)

Those encourage getting to the right question, facilitate learning, avoid orphaned questions, promote positive exchanges, ensure that the asker maintains "ownership" of their question, and can save time for other users who spent their time answering the pre-edit question.

Any other ways to encourage new user learning in light of the editing ability?

Context

For reference, check out this question.

  1. I wrote a question
  2. Received a downvote and was told to read the faqs for better questions
  3. Asked for more specific feedback on the question, so I could learn how to improve it
  4. At the same time, another user edited the question to be something very different
  5. Another user submitted an answer
  6. I proposed a revision to the question
  7. I received no feedback, so I posted a separate question
  8. The question was edited again by another user
  9. I now have an answer for that question
  10. I never learned how to improve my original question, or what made it a bad question, and I've spent two hours between writing responses on it, writing a separate question, and writing this meta post.

Problem

It's convenient for those with privs to go in and edit. When that happens, however:

  • The original question gets deleted
  • The question's original asker can't compare the original and revised versions
  • The question asker may not remember the original version
  • The new question's writer now has some ownership in the question
  • The question's meaning may get changed
  • Other users may spend time answering questions that nobody individually "owns" anymore
  • It wastes the user's time, which makes it more likely new users will leave
  • New users (like myself), can feel frustrated by wanting to improve their questions and instead having the question edited without constructive feedback

Suggestions

So a few suggestions on helping new users learn from editing:

  • If a user takes the time to write a question, it's considerate and respectful to ask before changing it
  • Explain why the question doesn't meet guidelines and suggest a different version
  • Provide constructive and specific feedback
  • If you must edit without asking (though I see no good reason for doing so), post the pre-edited version so users can compare (Feature request: SE should really build versioning in, if they're going to have the editing without asking ability)

Those encourage getting to the right question, facilitate learning, avoid orphaned questions, promote positive exchanges, ensure that the asker maintains "ownership" of their question, and can save time for other users who spent their time answering the pre-edit question.

Any other ways to encourage new user learning in light of the editing ability?

Context

  1. I wrote a question
  2. Received a downvote and user #1 told to read the faqs for better questions
  3. I asked for more specific feedback on the question, so I could learn how to improve it
  4. At the same time, user #2 edited the question to be something very different
  5. Then user #3 submitted an answer
  6. I proposed a revision to the question
  7. I received no feedback, so I posted a separate question
  8. The question was edited again by user #4
  9. I never learned how to improve my original question, or what made it a bad question, and I've spent two hours between writing responses on it, writing a separate question, and writing this meta post.

Problem

It's convenient for those with privs to go in and edit. When that happens, however:

  • The original question gets deleted
  • The question's original asker can't compare the original and revised versions
  • The question asker may not remember the original version
  • The new question's writer now has some ownership in the question
  • The question's meaning may get changed
  • Other users may spend time answering questions that nobody individually "owns" anymore
  • It wastes the user's time, which makes it more likely new users will leave
  • New users (like myself), can feel frustrated by wanting to improve their questions and instead having the question edited without constructive feedback

Suggestions

So a few suggestions on helping new users learn from editing:

  • If a user takes the time to write a question, it's considerate and respectful to ask before changing it
  • Explain why the question doesn't meet guidelines and suggest a different version
  • Provide constructive and specific feedback
  • If you must edit without asking (though I see no good reason for doing so), post the pre-edited version so users can compare (Feature request: SE should really build versioning in, if they're going to have the editing without asking ability)

Those encourage getting to the right question, facilitate learning, avoid orphaned questions, promote positive exchanges, ensure that the asker maintains "ownership" of their question, and can save time for other users who spent their time answering the pre-edit question.

Any other ways to encourage new user learning in light of the editing ability?

2 edited tags
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source | link

Editing Protocols: How to encourage new user learning?

Context

For reference, check out this question.

  1. I wrote a question
  2. Received a downvote and was told to read the faqs for better questions
  3. Asked for more specific feedback on the question, so I could learn how to improve it
  4. At the same time, another user edited the question to be something very different
  5. Another user submitted an answer
  6. I proposed a revision to the question
  7. I received no feedback, so I posted a separate question
  8. The question was edited again by another user
  9. I now have an answer for that question
  10. I never learned how to improve my original question, or what made it a bad question, and I've spent two hours between writing responses on it, writing a separate question, and writing this meta post.

Problem

It's convenient for those with privs to go in and edit. When that happens, however:

  • The original question gets deleted
  • The question's original asker can't compare the original and revised versions
  • The question asker may not remember the original version
  • The new question's writer now has some ownership in the question
  • The question's meaning may get changed
  • Other users may spend time answering questions that nobody individually "owns" anymore
  • It wastes the user's time, which makes it more likely new users will leave
  • New users (like myself), can feel frustrated by wanting to improve their questions and instead having the question edited without constructive feedback

Suggestions

So a few suggestions on helping new users learn from editing:

  • If a user takes the time to write a question, it's considerate and respectful to ask before changing it
  • Explain why the question doesn't meet guidelines and suggest a different version
  • Provide constructive and specific feedback
  • If you must edit without asking (though I see no good reason for doing so), post the pre-edited version so users can compare (Feature request: SE should really build versioning in, if they're going to have the editing without asking ability)

Those encourage getting to the right question, facilitate learning, avoid orphaned questions, promote positive exchanges, ensure that the asker maintains "ownership" of their question, and can save time for other users who spent their time answering the pre-edit question.

Any other ways to encourage new user learning in light of the editing ability?