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I got a notification that this question was moved to the English language stack exchange, and I am curious why. I get that, yes, it does discuss the right English word to use for a label CTA, but it is also talking about a label on a CTA. Labels and terms are hugely important to user experience, and my concern isn't so much with the fate of this exact submission, but that leaves me to wonder what other questions have been moved away from here that are relevant to the UX stack. We're a holistic discipline, and it'll cover a lot of other ground that other stacks may also cover.

I am sure whoever moved it had their reasons, and I respect that, but I would like to understand why it was moved. I really would never think to look into a English language stack for label conventions, and don't want to have to start.

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It's not that UX was an inappropriate site for it, more that English Language was possibly a better fit for it. The main UX decision had already been made; the user-journey had been decided on and all that was left to decide was what tone-of-voice to use. While UX people have a good knowledge of this in general, if there is a particular meaning and intention required for the label then asking experts in language usage is certainly not a bad thing to do. English language isn't just used on the paper page, so just because this question referred to a CTA option, that CTA uses English Language to try to get the message across, just as if a form on a printed piece of paper in an office does.

As for the exact reasons as to why it was migrated - several users flagged it suggesting it be migrated across and when this happens as a Moderator I would go and speak to one of the moderators on the suggested target site and see if they feel it's a better fit for that site.

  • I guess what I find disappointing is that "better" fit seems like the wrong way to run this site. The language on labels is one of the most important UX decisions to make. The author of the question came to ask UX designers what they would use. Moving it to an English language stack might lend them a more academic answer that comes from the viewpoint and doesn't take into account user interaction. – Zak Oct 16 '13 at 17:12
  • (cont) Seems like this stack would be better served covering any topic that can effect UX for those of us who wish to talk to other UX folks. I'm not on other stacks, and the author never would have received my (chosen) answer to the question, which came from a UX mindset. By moving the question, you changed the type of responder the author was going to hear from. Stands to reason if they wanted English language experts to answer the question they would have started there. – Zak Oct 16 '13 at 17:13
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    You talk about 'the way the site is run' and that 'By moving the question, you changed the type of responder...' as if this was a unilateral decision taken by me, whereas it was a decision by other members of the community; I just act on those decisions. Don't forget there is good, useful information across all stackexchange sites and many people are members of many of them. You can get a good all round understand of problems by visiting many of them rather than only ux - just as developers can gain a better understand of problems by visiting this site rather than just StackOverflow. – JonW Oct 16 '13 at 18:06
  • This issue itself may also benefit this UX site. People on English Language & Usage will see the question came from here so it's increasing awareness of this site, just as you are now aware of that one now. Overall we all benefit by finding that there are experts in many fields all throughout stack exchange. And also you are entitled to visit that site and flag the question for migration back to here should you desire, and it'll go through the same process as occurred with it here. Perhaps they will agree with you that here is the better place after all? – JonW Oct 16 '13 at 18:10

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