Episode #125 of the Stack Overflow podcast is here. We talk Tilde Club and mechanical keyboards. Listen now
20

I think the solution (closure) may be attacking the wrong side of the problem. The problem isn't the question; it's the answers that need moderation. The Moderator originally 'protected' the question (before ultimately closing it), because the influx of answers were reportedly widely speculative; offering little more than opinion than anything authoritative....


11

Here's what happened with that question: Jan 15 - 4 answers (one of which came the closest to actually answering the question) Jan 16 - 8 new answers, then question is protected. Jan 17 - 2 new answers Jan 18 - 1 new answer Jan 19 - 0 new answers Jan 20 - Question closed Of these answers some have since been deleted. One such answer (the one that ...


9

That question could just as equally been closed as being Not A Real Question, as the OP wasn't really asking anything in particular, and even though that was pointed out to the OP in a (up voted) comment they made no improvements to it. A reasonably similar duplicate was found to link it to so the question wasnt totally wasted, but really it's quite a poor ...


6

Adapted from Cryptography meta, originally posted by Ninefingers. tl;dr closing questions help us edit them into shape before they get vague/unrelated answers and helps keep the quality of the site's content high. Rationale: why do we close questions? There are really two ways to do moderation. If you've been on any of the .moderated newsgroups you'll be ...


5

The questions that remain open are ones that are both useful to other people (i.e. situations that could present themselves in future projects) and can be answered using expert UX knowledge and don't rely on explicit localised information from the one specific UI designer, as is the case for several of those questions. Your question about the iOS closing of ...


5

I think that this is a trait shared among most "Why is X as it is?" questions. People are curious creatures and love to reason and come up with theories. Proving the theories, well, that's hard work, we can leave it out. I think that this could have been a good question if the asker had said, "Does a washing machine with a bull eye have advantages over one ...


4

That question isn't suitable for re-opening because it goes against specific StackExchange guidelines (not just ux.stackexchange but all stackexchange sites). As per the FAQ, which is global for all SE sites (except for the 'What makes a good question' section which is site-specific): To prevent your question from being flagged and possibly removed, ...


3

Yes. Absolutely. If they're open, they set a precedent that lets new users to post the same kinds of questions and then be upset about the questions being closed.


3

Let's leave the current closed question alone since it was so controversial. If you want to re-ask a similar question (one that passes the various tests we have in place for good questions), you can of course go ahead!


3

Disregarding any issues at Programmers of which I'm not aware, here's the problem with the question: there's no way to know the answer. It's one of those questions we get here sometimes where the only way to determine the answer is to test it. There's no point asking a bunch of UX designers who have nothing to do with the community or product in question ...


3

The ideal solution to this problem is to carry out the claim in the "closed" message (which says "its answers may be merged with another identical question") and then exclude the issue from search results (so the duplicate question can die gracefully). If that's not possible/feasible, my alternate proposal to resolve this issue would be to move the "Linked" ...


2

Pretty much the only time an "X recommendation" question is left often is when it has a very well defined, narrow scope. In this case you're asking "What tool is best to do this particular task?" however the Sketching question is just asking generally which Sketching program is good; there's hardly a good answer there beyond personal opinion. Some prefer ...


2

This question can't be reopened because it doesn't have one answer and community wiki isn't the solution.


2

I'm not sure whether you tried to submit an answer or a comment based on your post/comments, but you should be perfectly able to leave an answer. However, due to the message you got, I'm pretty sure you got caught in a service disruption the Stack Exchange network is experiencing. It's nothing deliberate and will probably be resolved shortly (or is resolved, ...


2

Looking over the timeline of events for that question the following happened: The question was asked It received several votes for closure for being 'too broad' It was reviewed by the community; several others suggested for it to be closed (although a few voted for it to remain open) it recieved the fifth close vote and was therefore put On Hold. You edited ...


1

The general pattern on the site seems to be: to disable features you don't have permissions for and give a message explaining why (for example the Review queues) to hide features that are not relevant to the current context (for example, the answer box on closed questions) Because the button is not applicable to the current context (but may be applicable ...


1

A couple of these happen because we're trying to minimize the damage; closing is a reversible action, so posts can stop being duplicates. I think this might be why there's the "possible duplicate" wording. I know that's why the posts aren't merged; it'd be a big mess if a post were mistakenly closed as dupes and the answers were permanently moved over. In ...


1

Certainly, I've noticed on occasion a user will actually post a new answer to these posts. This should be prevented, in addition to setting the precedent that "this isn't allowed anymore".


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible