19

The edit time-window is there for you to correct spelling mistakes or suchlike that you only really notice once you've hit 'Add'. If the edit period were indefinite this would open up the possibility of abuse. Take this hypothetical example. A comment is left against a post by two people: Billy: "This is a great post" Jenny: "Thanks Billy, I ...


7

Both problems are seen on StackExchange sites: Some answers are written as comments. Some things that should be comments are written as answers. The benefit of commenting vs using the answers StackExchange sites are not fora: if every single little comment is at the same level in the thread, how do you find the relevant answer? Thanks to votes, maybe. ...


6

Reading the audit trail of actions on that post it appears that there were lots of flags raised on many comments in that post. Several comments have been deleted (and I've now deleted several more) to clean the whole thing up and that particular comment was edited instead of being deleted because it was relevant but confrontational in nature. I disagree ...


6

@JonW's answer is correct for the question you ask in the title (Why can comments be edited for ONLY 5 mins?) For the related question you ask in your post Is there any way I can edit the comment after 5 mins also? there is a workaround. Unless someone else has already responded to your comment, you should be able to fix it using the following steps: Copy ...


5

From the Comments privilege page: What are comments? Comments are temporary "Post-It" notes left on a question or answer. They can be up-voted (but not down-voted) and flagged, but do not generate reputation. There's no revision history, and when they are deleted they're gone for good. Please note that you can always comment on your own posts, and ...


5

Voting on SE is anonymous. That means that we can't force users to add comments while they vote. Up votes is pretty straight forward: a user found the answer useful. But down votes are different. That's why we on every down vote encourage people to explain what's wrong. But we can't force them to add a comment. Here on UX.SE it's an unwritten rule that you ...


5

If a question can be answered with just a single line then that probably means one of two things: The question is very simple and doesn't show any research effort to find the solution, or there is no single solution (such as a poll for 'what is the best book on UX?') The answer does not provide any research evidence, reasoning or description. In both ...


4

As I point out on Arquade's Meta. flagging comments has no consequence for the flagged user. Now, if you flag a bunch of spam or offensive posts from that user a moderator may manually decide to contact or suspend that user based on a history of rude/non-constructive comments, but there is no automatic punishment. And we're definitely not going to punish ...


3

It's probably a judgement call. If it's a question where the poster has been genuinely mistaken in where to ask it, then it's probably not an issue to help them out in a comment. However, if it's a question posted out of sheer laziness on the part of the poster where they've clearly not even done a basic Google search, or haven't even bothered to check what ...


3

From the help tour: Use comments to ask for more information or clarify a question or answer. Comments are generally to improve the quality of the question or answer, either by directly suggesting a change, asking for clarification or adding additional relevant info. We generally don't like too many "dialog" comments either--back and forth should ...


3

Do I get a badge for being specifically called out in a Meta question? I only wish I realized this question was here sooner! I will extend on JonW's answer with a first-hand account... In the particular example you call out, you see what my intentions are. I felt the blurb was useful, but it lacked any supporting evidence to explain why a 4-digit year (in ...


3

Totally agree with you on this. It's been an issue across stack exchange for over 2 years but no resolution as yet. The post on Meta StackOverflow about this issue has (at present) 137 upvotes and no downvotes, it's had bounties raised and awarded on it too but it's still not been implemented. I suggest adding your upvote to that Meta.StackOverflow post ...


2

I'm not sure whether you tried to submit an answer or a comment based on your post/comments, but you should be perfectly able to leave an answer. However, due to the message you got, I'm pretty sure you got caught in a service disruption the Stack Exchange network is experiencing. It's nothing deliberate and will probably be resolved shortly (or is resolved, ...


2

NSFW sites still contain valid UX patterns, so shouldn't be off-limits for suggestions. However we obviously need to tread carefully. If you're concerned about someone accidentally clicking an unsuitable link then I would suggest keeping the link as plain-text and prefixing it with NSFW, so the user can copy the link text itself and not accidentally click ...


2

No, comments doesn't have reputation. The answer given before is the correct answer. The only thing you “earn” from reputation is three badges: Tumbleweed - Asked a question with zero score, no answers, no comments, and low views for a week. Commentator - Leave 10 comments. Pundit - Leave 10 comments with score of 5 or more. In your case, you didn’t get 6 ...


1

I would add that if it's possible to demonstrate what is needed with a static image or two, I would post images with the NSFW sections blurred out. Usually static images are better as they keep the question relevant long after the site has changed.


1

Comments don't give you reputation, no. All of your reputation points are accounted for from your standard posts and you can keep track of reputation changes from your profile Reputation tab.


1

In that situation you should flag the comment / post itself to state that is unclear and one of the mods can either: a) remove that comment b) reinstate the deleted comment They're not really for ongoing discussions anyway, plus comments get flagged a lot so it's often easier for the mods to just delete the flagged ones if they look like they're not much ...


1

The general pattern on the site seems to be: to disable features you don't have permissions for and give a message explaining why (for example the Review queues) to hide features that are not relevant to the current context (for example, the answer box on closed questions) Because the button is not applicable to the current context (but may be applicable ...


1

There are no real drawbacks to flagging comments that are obsolete, in fact it should be encouraged as it will help keep the possible confusion related to obsolete comments on the site down to a minimum, as well as improving the overall noise level resulting from too many long-winded comments. Flagging a comment that then gets actioned actually counts ...


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