51

I think this policy has gotten too far out of hand; any question asked in regards to an icon or visual metaphor is closed. Asking what can represent a common action or concept is a perfectly valid question and is not too localized. Questions that ask for specific icons or icons that fit their visual theme are probably too localized. The problem with this ...


13

This type of question is probably usually "too localized". The icon required will be specific to that user and that application. As Ben points out in his comment asking for why a particular icon is OK. The close reason Too Localized is no longer in use, there is instead a special close reason to use under "this question is off topic because that reads: ...


12

At the time of the above "reasoning", Flat design trends were barely even a thing, and mobile interface design consideration was nowhere near as influential or dominant as it is now. Icons weren't anywhere near as relevant or significant in interface design, either. Given the HIG of Apple and the predominance of two significant companies and their massive ...


8

We should change our FAQ's first section to read: User Experience - Stack Exchange is for User Experience Designers, Information Architects, and Human Computer Interaction researchers. How's that for a first draft? Please vote to indicate support and comment if you think anything should be changed/added/ect I've gone and added this in as there have been ...


4

Programmers and Web apps are easier subjects to define what is on and offtopic, though. User experience is such a broad, vaguely defined area that it often comes down to individual questions and the way they're phrased. So far the only hard, fast rules I know of are: No implementation questions No "critique my X" questions No "what do you think of Y" ...


4

My current theory is that the question should be self contained. We should be able to fully understand the question without clicking a link or downloading an app. My hope is that if we enforce that rule, askers will be forced to put some thought into their questions and keep the scope reasonably narrow.


4

It's one of those topics that can arguably included in the realm of user experience design when you argue that everything is part of the user experience. In the interests of scope and of putting questions in the best place for them to get good answers, though, I think almost all implementation questions would be best served by Stack Overflow's userbase.


4

I've taken another stab. What kind of questions can I ask here? User Experience - Stack Exchange is for user experience researchers and designers. What is User Experience? It's a broad field, drawing expertise from psychologists, writers, industrial designers, typographers, computer scientists, and architects -- just to name a few. If ...


4

Live examples are extremely helpful, it immediately presents the context of your application or question and may give details you did not or could not give in the wording of your question. At the very least give a screenshot if possible. Examples using JSfiddle are great, such as this question which involved a specific design. Giving feedback on that case ...


4

As long as a question meets most of the criteria in Good Subjective, Bad Subjective I don't think it matters whether the product was designed by the asker or someone else. Inspire answers that explain “why” and “how”. Tend to have long, not short, answers. Have a constructive, fair, and impartial tone. Invite sharing experiences over opinions. ...


3

I think we should pull from this great post on the SE blog http://blog.stackoverflow.com/2010/09/good-subjective-bad-subjective/ In summary we could write: What makes a good question? Questions inspire answers that explain “why” and “how”. Questions tend to have long, not short, answers. Questions have a constructive, fair, and impartial tone....


3

Adding to Rahul's answer, I think it would be good to come up with a list of categories into which most questions fit. Then we can specify which categories are always off topic and provide guidelines on the ones that can be on topic. Types of questions that tend to be asked: What's the name for this [design pattern, methodology, UI control...]? Why was ...


3

I would agree that a comment in the FAQ should be made to discourage them. I think I would rather see questions that were asking "How can I know when I have the correct icon/colour/shape/whatever" rather than "Please save me looking up possibilities and point me to the right places". I think there are better places for specific advice, and the responses from ...


2

That's tricky, because UX is technically not out of beta. Actually not "technically", but UX is not out of beta, period. So it'll have to stay that way because UX is an exception to our process.


2

I don't think how to write code is a topic of UX. Semantic code is better for accessibility and SEO but still it's related to code. SO if someone is asking how to write a semantic code then it's should be move to stackoverflow.com


2

As a general rule, I hate shutting down questions that have even a tangential UX connection. However, in this one case, I would almost always refer people to something like https://icons8.com/request-icon/free/hot That site is totally focused on icons. If you get votes, they make them pretty quickly. It's not a huge community, but it is really targeted to ...


2

Fixed. Thanks for the suggestion!


2

That's a good idea. However the page you've linked to (the Don't Ask page) is a network-wide one. All Stack Exchange sites have the same content on that page and it isn't editable to be custom for each site. What we do have flexibility over is the TOUR page that is displayed to new users. There are some Ask About / Don't Ask About sections in there. So, i'...


1

The closure reasons are currently in the process of being updated, but the FAQ will also be considered for updation and amendment. To quote Stack Exchange developer Jaydles we agree. We are already working on an FAQ overhaul, which we'll share for input once we've got a little more done. The key question here is what we can do to address the problem best ...


1

The problem with that question is a misunderstanding of the term "user experience" - Naji felt that this is a website full of "experienced users" so he can ask them anything and get help. I don't think it was because the FAQ didn't cover what is allowable here. As for other questions, even if we amend the FAQ with improvements to scope, there will still be ...


1

Eh. I don't buy it. Random sites get random off topic questions, I don't have a shadow of a doubt that he read the FAQ, understood the apparent scope of the site and thought that post was appopriate here. I'm all for improving the FAQ, but explicitly listing everything that's off topic is the opposite of an improvement. If there's a very common new user ...


1

I suggest that you search for existing questions before you post the questions on UX. Then you'll find Must-read User Interface books and Which prototyping tools for example. There are also the training and education tags, among others.


1

There are two questions, I think, in the decision about where to put or move a question. Firstly, where does the concept and context fit - and anything in the realms of HTML or the front end of a forms application would then fit on here. However the other issue is where questions are most likely to get the best and most appropriate answers. Sometimes, this ...


1

I don't think these questions belong here. From an UX standpoint it's pretty clear that icons don't really help (except in some rare cases). I tried to explain how such a questions could be asked to meet the requirements my comment here, but it doesn't seem to have worked. In addition these questions don't meet the "avoid asking subjective questions" rule ...


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