23

These are the primary ways of adding visuals on UX, with their pros & cons. Mockups Pros: create one right away online Pros: Best clarity and configuration for complex visuals Pros: Can be attractive Pros: users can copy & edit your mockup directly to make an answer Cons: There's a learning curve to use the tool. (one time cost) Cons: Can take ...


16

It's perfectly ethical to comment on the public design and / or behaviour of a company. If company XYZ has poor UX, then they should be called out on it, and it should hurt their reputation. In the same way that if restaurant ABC had terrible food, they should also be called out on it. The only place that ethics would come into play would be if someone ...


13

We're getting a bit hung up here on "copy is included in UX" and ignoring the actual situation here I think. The question, as originally asked, was certainly not a matter of copy: why we using the word OOPS if something went to wrong in the sentence or communication with others? I would like to know the correct information regarding this question. Any ...


13

There isn't any reason that I'm aware of, other than it hasn't been done yet. I think it would be a great idea though.


12

Unfortunately this is one of these "it depends" answers which is leading into a discussion instead of a real answer. But on Meta, we're OK with that. For starters, if you are in any tech industry and are provided with an error message like "The UPSA failed to provision due to lack of free memory" then adding How do I solve error message doesn't add any ...


11

I posit that the practice of UX should be on topic: how to conduct a usability study using paper prototypes how to insert UX into an agile dev project how to communicate the value of usability testing to business users how to communicate with a usability study subject that is struggling without invalidating the result of the study In the past how to do ...


9

In one way, that's the beauty of our community. It's very soft and blurry on the edges, which my UX-me loves and my programmer-me hates. Community members can get away with a well-formulated, slightly off-topic question, just because it's interesting. We lose ourselves in interesting things, rather than determining if its on- or off-topic. Some say this is ...


9

For me, the biggest thing for on-topicness is "who would best answer this question?" That's why I find "what word do I use for..." generally falls to the English stack more than here, and the "how do I...in Javascript" falls to Stack Overflow. If the question is uniquely, primarily or best answered by someone in the field of UX, it's probably on topic. So, ...


8

Here are a few cases where moderators would need to remove a post using company branding: 1. Advertising or promoting a brand without any specific UX question What do you think of my new company logo? Is this website I made good UX? 2. Bashing one brand while promoting your own Moderators that visit the forum regularly can tell the difference between an ...


7

Yes, but since the audience is primarily English (and generally expected to be able to use English) the question itself should be in English, and it's most helpful that any non-English text in screenshots/etc is translated/explained unless it doesn't get in the way of answering questions. As for translating an interface, that's what the language, ...


7

Disclaimer: This is my personal opinion as an employee of Stack Exchange. This is not an official company stance. First, you should go read the great post Joel Spolsky wrote about the history and future of Stack Exchange, Stack Overflow and Stack Overflow Careers Joel wrote it after Stack Exchange closed it latest funding round with Andreessen Horowitz last ...


6

To continue the discussion, the real question is: At what point are questions related to English not about user experience? Here's the stick: http://www.slideshare.net/randallsnare/usable-language-how-content-shapes-the-user-experience Content helps to shape the experience for users (people) but many of us are not copywriters. We can limit questions ...


5

I do not really understand how this is going to encourage people to ask more questions about physical UX. Maybe it will improve the quality of questions (even that I am not sure) or the amount of them, but it will probably not increase the amount of a specific type of questions. There is probably something to do with the presentation of the forum: In the ...


5

Yes, all of the above is on topic.


5

Tell me what solutions and patterns you've already considered, then tell me why they didn't work for you. This doesn't just stop me giving you an answer you can't use - it helps expose the constraints. Describe the use case to me. Tell me why users are interacting with your interface, and what point they're at in their offline workflow. Tell me what users ...


5

First of all, I have to admit I accidentally clicked on this question while watching a World Cup match, only to surprisingly find my question on the top of the list mentioned. Now, I'm a complete newbie in this forum so I don't quite know how this Meta sibling of the main site works as well as the way the discussions should go. So my excuses if this's not ...


5

I really don't like these questions. If we refer to the FAQ page What types of questions should I avoid asking? What types of questions should I avoid asking? First, make sure that your question is on-topic for this site. You should only ask practical, answerable questions based on actual problems that you face. Chatty, open-ended questions ...


5

I'm a fan of a liberal/broader policy on questions on SE. This is a great example of a question that's worthy of meta debate. That said, I think "design a teapot" is probably a little broad as a question (nice book reference with the photo btw). But, perhaps a constructive way to narrow the specificity while still providing plenty of breadth would be to ...


5

I sometimes go back and forth on whether or not I think these questions are useful for the site. However, I fear that covering off such basics could lead the site to be thought of as quite simplistic - comparable to Yahoo Answers / Quora in just allowing all sorts of questions. Stack Exchange sites expect users to have done some research into their problem ...


4

I've been noticing some patterns in which you can predict the number of answers provided based on the type of question that's been asked. Basically anything that's "hard to answer" tends to be unanswered. This is really unfortunate because some of these are gems. Here are two types I find are legit UX questions with poor answer rates. Questions with ...


4

As long as a question meets most of the criteria in Good Subjective, Bad Subjective I don't think it matters whether the product was designed by the asker or someone else. Inspire answers that explain “why” and “how”. Tend to have long, not short, answers. Have a constructive, fair, and impartial tone. Invite sharing experiences over opinions. ...


4

It depends, but generally it's better to simplify your question so that you describe one thing which can be answered. You will get better answers that way. If you need to provide background to help explain the problem you're having, you can do so, but even then, try to keep it to a minimum. If you really do have several questions that need to be answered ...


4

No, not really suitable. Primarily because there is no answer to a Pros and Cons question. Someone will say one thing they think is a Pro, someone else will give another example, another person will say some things they think are Cons... Nothing is actually the solution to the question. You should phrase such questions as "Should I do X for my situation". ...


3

Unfortunately no. UX Stack Exchange is intended to be a Q&A site, not a repository for information on design. I recommend providing in http://www.reddit.com/r/design


3

Yes, it evolves, and it's set by community guidelines and the community's interpretation of the general Stack Exchange guidelines, the most basic of which is that this is a question and answer site. Popularity in and of itself is a bad measure as well; popularity is great, but without a second measure it's pretty useless. Otherwise Justin Bieber is the ...


3

It was posted on Hacker News, they're generally the culprit for these spikes (more rarely Reddit).The site's referrers analytics (mod only info we can only give "big picture" descriptions of) shows that Hacker News' referrer counts account for much of that 20k.


3

The problem with "how do I ..." type questions is that they tend to be so broad that a complete answer would be a mini tutorial at best, and a short book in most cases. Does that make a good question on UX.SE? If questions are overly broad, you tend to end up with the answer being a mix of points from a number of questions, as each answer will tend to ...


3

I'm glad you asked this question as I've pondered it too. It's also an interesting UX question on its own right. I've resolved this from a UX approach by asking myself "what would users most likely search for to find this answer?" That may not resolve the issue for everyone, but for me it gets to the pith of the issue because: It helps promote SE's ...


3

That's not quite true. You approved the original edit and automatically added an additional edit to the edit log. https://ux.stackexchange.com/posts/85815/revisions From an audit trail point of view then everything is accounted for. They get their credit for a successful edit, as do you. Just that yours came more recently so it shows on the question itself ...


3

Well not exactly. Unanswered doesn't necessarily mean that there are no answers, nor that no answer has been accepted, but that there are no upvoted answers. Asking a question and being given a response that nobody deems worthy of voting for is not really much different than asking a question and not receiving any responses. Both are equally unhelpful to ...


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